Cap’s Off to You! Billie Jones & Celebrating Story

Versión en Español se puede encontrar a continuación o haga clic aquí para ir allí. Haga clic en mí para saltar a la parte española. You can support Story Crossroads by clicking here.  Give today!

billie-jones-2012

Featuring:  Billie Jones

Wife, Librarian Storyteller-in-Residence, DTM-Distinguished Toastmaster from UT

Billie makes a promise to do something and always goes beyond the expected.  She was one of the first storytelling faces that welcomed me with smiles when I first moved to Utah and attended my first Utah Storytelling Guild chapter meeting. Many years later and she initiated and strengthened the relationship between Story Crossroads and Toastmasters International.  She attended every chapter of Toastmasters in the Salt Lake County area and surrounding counties to share the purpose and needs of Story Crossroads over a couple months.  I do not even know where to begin in thanks to her for that part alone.  Then she scheduled and instructed the Toastmasters on emceeing and acting as hosts so that all felt welcomed to the event.  This is no surprise as Billie has always had everyone feel welcomed on a personal and a professional level.

So enjoy the past, present, and future influences of storytelling in the life of Billie Jones.

Rachel:  What drew you to storytelling? 

Billie:  I grew up with two Grandmothers telling stories to me and my siblings.  When we would visit them in Louisiana, the first thing we’d do is say, “Tell us stories about your growing up and about Daddy’s growing up.”  So I’ve always had stories.  We had stories all over the place.  The last week of June every year—in that week was my Grandmother’s birthday—the whole family would get together.  Sometimes we would have fish fries and sometimes we’d just be out in the backyard [making] homemade ice cream, which we loved.  All the time we were doing this, there were stories going on in the background—my Aunts and Uncles and my Grandmother.  So stories were in my blood from the time I was very little. 

Rachel:  What are some of your favorite memories with stories and storytelling? Why? 

Billie:  One of the memories is my Daddy’s Mother had a little bedroom and [my little sister and I would gather] and say, “Tell us stories about your growing up.”  And she would tell us stories about when my Dad was about three years old, their house burned and all that was left was a little leather shoe that one of [my Dad’s] Uncles had made.

Another memory is when I co-chaired a committee in the American Library Association.  I started a storytelling group, and we would have librarians and interested people come to our hotel room and we would just share stories.  Some people did personal stories.  Some people just told fairy tales or folktales.  All kinds of stories.  We did that for every library convention for a number of years.

Another special memory for me is every summer my husband and I would attend the family reunion for Mother’s siblings and children.  We would go down through Houston to Galveston, go across on the ferry to the Bolivar Peninsula and meet my family at my Uncle’s cabin that was on stilts because it was so close to the river.  And we would just tell stories and listen.  Most of the time we would just listen and I would jot down little things to help me remember some of the stories so I would not forget.  I learned about family growing up in Louisiana in the piney woods—lots of stories about that.  My Mother’s Mother was a great one for pulling tricks on people and telling scary stories to the kids.  So I guess part of those genes is in my blood, too, from my other Grandmother.  So we just picked it all up.  I just soaked it all in like a sponge.

Some other fun things, I did a storytelling workshop in a women’s prison one year.  It was magnificent to see these women who made wrong choices but they still had feelings and a lot of them talked about their toys that they had when they were growing up.  It changed the way I looked at people by hearing their stories.

The Traveling Tellers is another special memory that is in my little memory box.  I told stories all over the state of Utah with different storytellers that were in the Olympus [Chapter of the Utah Storytelling Guild] at the time. 

I enjoyed and still have good memories of the children’s programs at the public libraries where I worked most of my career.  I did it at the city libraries and also at the county when I went to work for the county. 

I have given workshops for Toastmasters International in Utah, California, Idaho, Washington, and even in Canada.  Toastmasters, in general, want to be storytellers—many of them.  From working with Toastmasters, I have learned that stories can be used in businesses, in places that you wouldn’t think—stories need to be everywhere.

Rachel:  How have you seen the influence of stories and storytelling in what you do now (if at all)? 

Billie:  Stories and storytelling has always been in my life.  I have a current job at a private school that I got because of my storytelling experience.  And every speech I have given in Toastmasters has contained some kind of story—either personal story or a story that helps the people—the audience—understand what I am trying to get across.

Rachel:  What are your plans for storytelling and using stories in the future?

Billie:  I really would like to continue to work on my personal stories and share them with others.  I have been in the process of recording some of my stories.  I am also working on a story for the school talent show that is coming up.  It’s exciting for me because I have the guitar teacher who is willing to help me—accompany me—and that will be fun.  The teacher is new and just came this year.  I am also updating and preparing a workshop for children.  I have done a lot for adults.   

Rachel:  Anything you would like to add about the importance of storytelling?

Billie:  Our stories help us connect with people.  Stories are everywhere.  Stories are very valuable to get a point across. 

My younger brother is a storyteller and he remembers things about Louisiana that I didn’t remember and you’d think it was the same place, we were there, but different people pull different things out of the same experience.  It just depends on your perspective.

Thank you to the permissions of Billie Jones to do this interview as well as the use of her picture.

We appreciate Billie sharing her experiences and influence with storytelling.  You have those moments, too.

Here is why:

Billie has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

Aquí lo tiene.

billie-jones-2012

Con:  Bille Jones

Esposa, Bibliotecario Narrador-en-Residencia, DTM-Distinguido Toastmaster de UT

Billie hace una promesa de hacer algo y siempre va más allá de lo esperado. Ella fue una de las primeras caras que me dieron la bienvenida con sonrisas cuando me mudé a Utah y asistí a mi primera reunión del capitulo del Cuento de Utah. Muchos años después, ella inició y fortaleció la relación entre Story Crossroads y Toastmasters International. Asistió a todos los capítulos de Toastmasters en el área del Condado de Salt Lake y condados circundantes para compartir el propósito y las necesidades de Story Crossroads durante un par de meses. Ni siquiera sé por dónde empezar gracias a ella por esa parte sola. Entonces ella programó e instruyó a los Toastmasters sobre emceeing y actuando como anfitriones para que todos se sintieran bienvenidos al evento. Esto no es ninguna sorpresa ya que Billie siempre ha tenido a todos se sienten bienvenidos en un nivel personal y profesional.

Así que disfruta de las influencias pasadas, presentes y futuras de la narración en la vida de Billie Jones.

Rachel: ¿Qué te llevó a contar historias?

Billie: Crecí con dos abuelas contando historias a mí ya mis hermanos. Cuando los visitáramos en Louisiana, lo primero que haríamos es decir: “Cuéntanos historias sobre tu crecimiento y sobre cómo papá está creciendo”. Así que siempre he tenido historias. Teníamos historias en todo el lugar. La última semana de junio de cada año -en esa semana era el cumpleaños de mi abuela- toda la familia se reunía. A veces teníamos papas fritas de pescado ya veces nos gustaría estar en el patio trasero [hacer] helado casero, que nos encantó. Todo el tiempo que estábamos haciendo esto, había historias en el fondo-mis tías y tíos y mi abuela. Así que las historias estaban en mi sangre desde que era muy pequeña.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son tus recuerdos preferidos con cuentos y cuentos? ¿Por qué?

Billie: Uno de los recuerdos es que la mamá de mi papá tenía un pequeño dormitorio y [mi hermana menor y yo nos reuníamos] y decíamos: “Cuéntanos historias sobre tu crecimiento”. Y nos contaría historias sobre cuando mi papá tenía unos tres años Su casa quemada y todo lo que quedaba era un pequeño zapato de cuero que uno de los tíos [de mi papá] había hecho.

Otro recuerdo es cuando copresidí un comité en la American Library Association. Empecé un grupo de cuentos, y tendríamos bibliotecarios y gente interesada en nuestra habitación de hotel y simplemente compartiríamos historias. Algunas personas hicieron historias personales. Alguna gente acaba de contar cuentos de hadas o cuentos de hadas. Todo tipo de historias. Hemos hecho eso por cada convención de la biblioteca por un número de años.

Otro recuerdo especial para mí es cada verano mi marido y yo asistiría a la reunión familiar para los hermanos de la madre y los niños. Nos gustaría ir a través de Houston a Galveston, cruzar en el ferry a la Península de Bolívar y conocer a mi familia en la cabaña de mi tío que estaba en zancos porque estaba tan cerca del río. Y solo contamos historias y escuchamos. La mayoría de las veces sólo escuchábamos y anotaría pequeñas cosas para ayudarme a recordar algunas de las historias, así que no lo olvidaría. Aprendí acerca de la familia que crecía en Louisiana en los bosques de pinos-muchas historias sobre eso. La madre de mi madre era una gran para tirar de trucos en la gente y de contar historias asustadizas a los cabritos. Así que supongo que parte de esos genes está en mi sangre, también, de mi otra abuela. Así que lo recogimos todo. Lo empapé todo como una esponja.

Otras cosas divertidas, hice un taller de narración en una prisión para mujeres un año. Fue magnífico ver a estas mujeres que tomaron decisiones equivocadas, pero todavía tenían sentimientos y muchos de ellos hablaban de sus juguetes que tenían cuando estaban creciendo. Cambió la manera en que miré a la gente escuchando sus historias.

The Traveling Tellers es otra memoria especial que está en mi pequeña caja de memoria. Conté historias en todo el estado de Utah con diferentes narradores que estaban en el Olimpo [Capítulo de la Guild Storytelling de Utah] en ese momento.

Disfruté y todavía tengo buenos recuerdos de los programas infantiles en las bibliotecas públicas donde trabajé la mayor parte de mi carrera. Lo hice en las bibliotecas de la ciudad y también en el condado cuando fui a trabajar para el condado.

He dado talleres para Toastmasters International en Utah, California, Idaho, Washington, e incluso en Canadá. Toastmasters, en general, quieren ser narradores de cuentos, muchos de ellos. De trabajar con Toastmasters, he aprendido que las historias pueden ser usadas en negocios, en lugares que no piensas, las historias deben estar en todas partes.

Rachel: ¿Cómo has visto la influencia de historias y narraciones en lo que haces ahora (si es que lo haces)?

Billie: Historias y cuentos siempre han estado en mi vida. Tengo un trabajo actual en una escuela privada que recibí debido a mi experiencia de contar historias. Y cada discurso que he dado en Toastmasters ha contenido algún tipo de historia, ya sea una historia personal o una historia que ayude a la gente, la audiencia, a comprender lo que estoy tratando de transmitir.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son tus planes para contar historias y usar historias en el futuro?

Billie: Realmente me gustaría seguir trabajando en mis historias personales y compartirlas con otras personas. He estado en el proceso de registrar algunas de mis historias. También estoy trabajando en una historia para el show de talentos de la escuela que está por venir. Es emocionante para mí porque tengo el profesor de guitarra que está dispuesto a ayudarme, acompañarme, y eso será divertido. El maestro es nuevo y acaba de llegar este año. También estoy actualizando y preparando un taller para niños. He hecho mucho por los adultos.

Rachel: ¿Quieres añadir algo sobre la importancia de contar historias?

Billie: Nuestras historias nos ayudan a conectarnos con la gente. Las historias están por todas partes. Las historias son muy valiosas para conseguir un punto a través.

Mi hermano menor es un cuentacuentos y recuerda cosas sobre Luisiana que no recuerdo y que pensaría que era el mismo lugar, estábamos allí, pero diferentes personas sacar cosas diferentes de la misma experiencia. Sólo depende de su perspectiva.

Gracias a los permisos de Billie Jones para hacer esta entrevista, así como el uso de su foto.

Apreciamos a Billie compartir sus experiencias e influencia con la narración de cuentos. Tienes esos momentos también.

He aquí por qué:

Billie tiene una historia. Tienes una historia. Todos tenemos historias.

Cap’s Off to You! Charlotte Starks and Celebrating Story

Versión en Español se puede encontrar a continuación o haga clic aquí para ir allí. Haga clic en mí para saltar a la parte española. You can now donate as a one-time or as a recurring monthly with appreciation gifts by clicking here.  Give today!

Charlotte Starks

Featuring:  Charlotte Starks

Mother, Grandmother, and Storyteller a.k.a. Mama Charlotte from UT

Charlotte Starks is about peace and love.  You know you are in the same room as her when you feel that warmth and acceptance.  She is a storyteller who grabs the attention of everyone and holds it beyond the telling of the tale.  I had the privilege of hearing her tell during one of the Story Crossroads Board meetings, as we have a tradition of a story being told at the end.  She is the President of the Nubian Storytellers of Utah Leadership (NSOUL) and is a mover and a shaker throughout the community.

So enjoy the past, present, and future influences of storytelling in Charlotte’s life.

Rachel:  What drew you to storytelling?

Charlotte:  What drew me to stories and storytelling was listening and learning from other people’s history and experience.  I like to hear someone’s history, experiences, and self-expression–stories about themselves and their families.  When I hear someone’s story, I can feel the positive messages.  I can heal past experiences and share the joy of American culture.

Rachel:  What are you plans for storytelling in the future?

Charlotte:  I will use stories and storytelling as a way to send positive messages, about family history, culture, and to enhance self-esteem.  Through NSOUL, I and the other members provide training on storytelling methods and perform for audiences around the state and country.  Over 128,000 students and adults have already enjoyed these programs and hundreds of thousands more will continue to have these dynamic experiences.  Some students have even had their desire to read increase because of learning to the stories.

Rachel:  Anything you would like to add about the importance of storytelling?

Charlotte:  Storytelling is importance and can be used as a positive communication channel to plant positive seeds about healing, history, and experience.

Thank you to the permissions of Charlotte to do this interview as well as the use of her picture.

We appreciate Charlotte sharing her experience and influence with storytelling.  You have those moments, too.

Here is why:

Charlotte has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

Aquí lo tiene.

Charlotte Starks

Con:  Charlotte Starks

Madre, Abuela, y Narrador (Mama Charlotte) de Utah

Charlotte Starks se trata de la paz y el amor. Usted sabe que está en la misma habitación que ella cuando se siente que el calor y la aceptación. Ella es un narrador que llama la atención de todo el mundo y lo mantiene más allá de la narración de la historia. Tuve el privilegio de escuchar decirle durante una de las reuniones de la historia de la Junta encrucijada, ya que tenemos una tradición de una historia que se cuenta al final. Ella es el presidente de los Narradores de Nubia de Utah Liderazgo (NSOUL) y es un motor y un agitador en toda la comunidad.

Así que disfruten el pasado, presente y futuro de la narración influencias en la vida de Charlotte.

Rachel: ¿Qué le atrajo a la narración?

Charlotte: ¿Qué me atrajo de cuentos y la narración estaba escuchando y aprendiendo de la historia y la experiencia de otras personas. Me gusta escuchar la historia de alguien, experiencias, y la autoexpresión – historias sobre sí mismos y sus familias. Cuando escucho la historia de alguien, puedo sentir los mensajes positivos. Puedo curar las experiencias pasadas y compartir la alegría de la cultura americana.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son tus planes para contar historias en el futuro?

Charlotte: Voy a utilizar historias y la narración como una forma de enviar mensajes positivos, sobre la historia de la familia, la cultura, y para mejorar la autoestima. A través de NSOUL, yo y los demás miembros que la formación en métodos de narración y llevar a cabo para el público de todo el estado y el país. Más de 128.000 estudiantes y adultos que ya han disfrutado de estos programas y cientos de miles más seguirán teniendo estas experiencias dinámicas. Algunos estudiantes incluso han tenido el deseo de leer aumento debido a las historias de aprendizaje.

Rachel: Cualquier cosa que quisiera añadir acerca de la importancia de contar historias?

Charlotte: Contar historias es importante y se puede utilizar como un canal de comunicación positiva para plantar semillas positivas acerca de la sanidad, la historia y la experiencia.

Gracias a los permisos de Charlotte para hacer esta entrevista, así como el uso de su imagen.

Apreciamos Charlotte compartir su experiencia e influencia con la narración. Usted tiene esos momentos, también.

He aquí por qué:

Charlotte tiene una historia. Usted tiene una historia. Todos tenemos historias.

Cap’s Off to You! Liesl Seborg and Celebrating Story

Versión en Español se puede encontrar a continuación o haga clic aquí para ir allí. Haga clic en mí para saltar a la parte española.  Come to the free Story Crossroads Festival on April 15-16, 2016 at the Viridian Event Center (8030 S. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT).

Liesl-Seborg-headshot

Featuring:  Liesl Seborg

Super Librarian, Dreamer of Dreams & Doer of Deeds from UT

Liesl Seborg has delight and energy for the library and for all people.  She is finally being recognized for this work and became “Librarian of the Year” through the Utah Library Association.  She plans so many outreach events with the Salt Lake County Library Services that it is hard to keep track what she is doing at the moment.  Somehow she has also immensely built the Story Crossroads dream. Liesl balanced organization know-how and technology to help with a successful gathering of 28 civic, education, arts, and storytelling leaders of the area during the first Community Planning Meeting held on June 3, 2014.  She has also told a story as part of the tradition of kicking off our meetings.  It is only fitting that we recognize and do a “cap’s off” during the same month of the Story Crossroads Festival launch.

 
So enjoy the past, present, and future influences of storytelling in Liesl’s life.
 
Rachel:  What drew you to storytelling/stories?
 

Liesl:  I have always enjoyed a well told tale. The energy and voice of the teller has always been fascinating. In my early days of independent reading, I fell in love with folk stories from around the world and would read every book on the topic I could lay my hands on. It was a way to experience the world and understand different cultures and ways of doing and things. I would be carried away–and that is what good stories and storytelling does for me.  In terms of how I got into telling stories myself, well, it’s a family thing and I enjoy audience reactions when I tell a story well–but that was only to family and friends. I finally had formal training when I was in library school from Margaret Read MacDonald and, most recently, excellent training from Steffani Raff as part of Story Crossroads. 

Rachel:  What are some of your favorite memories with stories/storytelling? Why?  
 
Liesl:  My maternal grandfather always told stories of family and larger than life activities. Although I never met her, my great grandmother (grandpa’s mom) was an author and quite the character in the town of Lombard, Illinois. She told wonderful stories and the Lilac festival they have each year was founded by her. My mother carries on the tradition within the family and ‘Twas a dark and stormy night…” is a family traditional tale.  I was also a Girl Scout for many years and the stories told in songs, and around the campfire, and while looking at the stars created a love of the rhythms of voice. 
 
Rachel:  How have you seen the influence of stories and storytelling in what you do now (if at all)? 
 

Liesl:  I am an adult services librarian now, and I tell the story of the library, of change, of kids reading and great things happening. When I was a youth services librarian I did storytime and would read aloud to grade school kids using all kinds of different voices for the characters. My telling skills and love of story have helped shape who I am and how effective I am when doing presentations. Oddly enough, I am an introvert–but when I am engaged in storytelling, I am playing the role of teller or a character or a performer and I rise to the task and give it my all.

 Rachel:  What are your plans for storytelling/using stories in the future? Tell me more. 
 
Liesl:  I plan to continue telling stories, although primarily in the business storytelling direction for the immediate future. My presentations have become more enjoyable for me and my audiences as I’ve developed and strengthened my skills. I’m also getting more momentum to write stories again as I work with local authors and storytellers. Maybe I will be like my great grandmother.  
 
Rachel:  Anything you would like to add about the importance of storytelling?
 

Liesl:  I think stories help us understand traditions, both familial and cultural, and that through stories we are all, strangers included, able to share an experience with each other.  as the world seems to get bigger while at the same time getting smaller, I think it is the universality of story and the love of stories that will unite humanity in a celebrations of differences and commonalities.  Story can change the world, one telling at a time.  

Thank you to the permissions of Liesl to do this interview as well as the use of her picture. 

We appreciate Liesl sharing her experience and influence with storytelling.  You have those moments, too.

Here is why:

Liesl has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

 

Aquí lo tiene.

Liesl-Seborg-headshot

Con: Liesl Seborg

Super Bibliotecario, Soñador de sueños, Hacedor de hechos de UT

Liesl Seborg tiene placer y energía para la biblioteca y para todas las personas. Ella está siendo finalmente reconocido para este trabajo y se convirtió en “bibliotecario del Año” por la Asociación de Bibliotecas de Utah. Ella planea tantos eventos de extensión con el Salt Lake County servicios bibliotecarios que es difícil seguir la pista de lo que está haciendo en este momento. De alguna manera ella también inmensamente ha construido la historia encrucijada sueño. Liesl organización equilibrada de tecnología y know-how para ayudar con una exitosa reunión de 28, la educación cívica y la narración de cuentos, artes, dirigentes de la zona durante la primera reunión de planificación de la comunidad celebrada el 3 de junio de 2014. Ella también ha escuchado una historia como parte de la tradición de Kicking Off nuestras reuniones. Es justo que reconozcamos y hacer un “Cap’s off” durante el mismo mes de la historia del Festival Crossroads lanzamiento.

Para disfrutar del pasado, presente y futuro las influencias de la narración oral en Liesl la vida.

Rachel: ¿Lo que le atrajo a la narración/historias?

Liesl: Siempre he disfrutado de una historia bien narrada. La energía y la voz del narrador ha sido siempre fascinante. En mis primeros días de lectura independiente, me enamoré de cuentos folclóricos de todo el mundo y leer todos los libros sobre el tema me podría sentar en mis manos. Fue una manera de experimentar el mundo y comprender las diferentes culturas y maneras de hacer y de las cosas. Quiero ser arrastrado–y eso es lo que las buenas historias y cuentos hace para mí. En términos de cómo llegué a contar historias a mí, bueno, es una cosa de familia y disfruto de las reacciones del público cuando me cuentan una historia bien, que era sólo para familiares y amigos.  Finalmente tuve una capacitación formal cuando yo estaba en la escuela de bibliotecología de Margaret Read MacDonald y, más recientemente, la excelente formación de Steffani Raff como parte de Historia encrucijada.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son tus recuerdos favoritos con historias o cuentos? ¿Por qué?

Liesl: Mi abuelo materno siempre se contaron historias de familia y la mayor de las actividades de la vida diaria. Aunque nunca me había encontrado con ella, mi bisabuela (la mamá de mi abuelo) fue un autor y bastante el personaje en la ciudad de Lombard, Illinois. Ella le dijo a maravillosas historias y el Lilac Festival tienen cada año fue fundada por ella. Mi madre lleva en la tradición dentro de la familia y ‘Twas una oscura y tormentosa noche…” es un cuento tradicional de la familia. Yo también era una de las Girl Scouts durante muchos años y las historias contadas en canciones, y alrededor de la fogata, y mirando a las estrellas creó un amor de los ritmos de la voz.

Rachel: ¿Cómo ha visto la influencia de historias y cuentos en lo que haces ahora (si en todos)?

Liesl: Soy un adulto servicios bibliotecario ahora, y cuento la historia de la biblioteca, de cambio, de la lectura para niños y grandes cosas. Cuando yo era un joven bibliotecario servicios hice cuentos y lea en voz alta a niños de escuela primaria utilizando todo tipo de sonidos diferentes para los personajes. Mi diciéndole a habilidades y amor de historia, han ayudado a dar forma a lo que soy y cuán eficaces cuando estoy haciendo presentaciones. Curiosamente, yo soy introvertido, pero cuando estoy metida en narración, estoy jugando el papel de cajero o un personaje o un ejecutante y yo estar a la altura de esa tarea y darle mi todo.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son tus planes para la narración/usar historias en el futuro? Tell me more.

Liesl: Pienso seguir contando historias, aunque principalmente en el sentido de narración de negocios para el futuro inmediato.  Mis presentaciones se han vuelto más agradable para mí y mi público como he desarrollado y fortalecido mis habilidades. También estoy recibiendo más impulso a escribir historias de nuevo como yo trabajo con los autores locales y los narradores. Tal vez voy a ser como mi bisabuela.

Rachel: ¿Cualquier cosa que le gustaría añadir acerca de la importancia de la narración?

Liesl: Creo historias nos ayudan a comprender las tradiciones familiares y culturales, y que, a través de cuentos, todos somos extraños incluido, poder compartir la experiencia con los demás. Cuando el mundo parece agrandarse mientras al mismo tiempo cada vez más pequeños, creo que es la universalidad de la historia y las historias de amor que une a la humanidad en una celebración de las diferencias y similitudes. Historia puede cambiar el mundo, diciéndole a la vez.

Gracias a los permisos de Liesl para hacer esta entrevista, así como el uso de su imagen.

Apreciamos Liesl compartiendo su experiencia e influencia con la narración. Tienes esos momentos, también.

Aquí está por qué:

Liesl tiene una historia. Usted tiene una historia. Todos tenemos historias.

Cap’s Off to You! Michael Capell and Celebrating Story

Versión en Español se puede encontrar a continuación o haga clic aquí para ir allí. Haga clic en mí para saltar a la parte española. You can now donate as a one-time or as a recurring monthly with appreciation gifts by clicking here.  Give today!

Michael Capell and wife (2)

Featuring:  Michael Capell

Husband, Father & Designer from UT

Michael Capell studied at Utah State University where he met Dr. David Sidwell, or “Dr. Dave” as most students call the professor.  This Dr. Dave shared the oral art form of storytelling from the whimsical to the dramatic sides.  Michael not only enjoyed this class though already saw storytelling as an essential part of his life.  Michael has delved into story through the visual arts, animation, and film.

So enjoy the past, present, and future influences of storytelling in Michael’s life.

Rachel:  What drew you to storytelling/stories?

Michael:  The visual side of it, through animation. I realized how essential the story is to the animation. One must convince the audience to care about what is happening to the characters in the animation and you do that by telling a good story where the audience is engaged.

Rachel:  What are some of your favorite stories/storytelling memories?

Michael:  Seeing the audience’s response to the tale (in person or on film).

Rachel:  Why?

Michael:  Then I know if what I made had an impact and if so, how. Creating only a few seconds of animation can take days, weeks or even months, but it is all worth it when you can see a positive result in the reaction of your audience.

Rachel:  How have you seen the influence of stories and storytelling in what you do now (if at all)?

Michael:  As a teacher, one can have all the knowledge in the world but without a way to effectively communicate, it counts for little. Through the use of stories and examples of relevant scenarios, students can become engaged and learn much more than they would if presented with a list of facts, formulas, and/or techniques. We’ve all had classes were we can hardly keep our attention on the professor. Our eyes and minds wonder and we learn nothing, but when using storytelling in strategic ways, an otherwise boring subject can be brought to life.

Rachel:  What are your plans for storytelling/using stories in the future?   

Michael:  Hopefully through teaching a new generation of story-tellers in one media or another; and independent film-making.

Rachel:  Anything you would like to add about the importance of storytelling?

Michael:  [Storytelling] is vital. For me as a teacher, it is key to making ideas understandable and why what I’m sharing has value.

Thank you to the permissions of Michael to do this interview as well as the use of his picture. 

We appreciate Michael sharing his experience and influence with storytelling.  You have those moments, too.

Here is why:

Michael has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

Aquí lo tiene.

Michael Capell and wife (2)

Featuring: Michael Capell

Esposo, Padre y Diseñador de UT

Michael Capell estudió en la Universidad del Estado de Utah, donde se entrevistó con el Dr. David Sidwell, o “Dr. Dave”, como la mayoría de los estudiantes llaman al profesor.  Este Dr. Dave compartió el arte de la narración oral de la caprichosa a la dramática lados.  Michael no sólo gozan de esta clase aunque ya vio la narración como parte esencial de su vida.  Michael ha profundizado en la historia a través de las artes visuales, animación y cine.

Para disfrutar del pasado, presente y futuro las influencias de la narración de la vida de Michael.

Rachel: ¿Lo que le atrajo a la narración/historias?

Michael:  El aspecto visual del mismo, a través de la animación. Me di cuenta de cuán esencial es la historia de la animación. Uno debe convencer al público a la atención acerca de lo que está sucediendo a los personajes de la animación y lo hace por contar una buena historia donde la audiencia está conectada.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son algunas de tus historias favoritas/storytelling recuerdos?

Michael:  Ver la reacción del público a la historia (en persona o en la película).

Rachel:  ¿Por qué?

Michael:  Entonces yo saber si lo que hice tenía un impacto y en caso afirmativo, de qué forma. La creación de sólo unos pocos segundos de animación puede durar días, semanas o incluso meses, pero es todo vale la pena cuando puedes ver un resultado positivo en la reacción de la audiencia.

Rachel: ¿Cómo ha visto la influencia de historias y cuentos en lo que haces ahora (si en todos)?

Michael:  Como profesor, uno puede tener todo el conocimiento en el mundo, pero sin una forma de comunicarse eficazmente, que vale poco. A través del uso de historias y ejemplos de escenarios relevantes, los estudiantes pueden participar y aprender mucho más de lo que lo harían si se le presenta una lista de hechos, fórmulas y/o técnicas. Todos hemos tenido clases eran difícilmente podemos mantener nuestra atención en el profesor. Los ojos y la mente pregunto y aprendemos nada, pero cuando se utiliza la narración en formas estratégicas, de lo contrario un tema aburrido puede ser traído a la vida.

Rachel: ¿Cuáles son tus planes para la narración/usar historias en el futuro?

Michael:  Esperemos que a través de la enseñanza de una nueva generación de narradores en uno u otro medio; y el cine independiente de decisiones.

Rachel:  ¿Cualquier cosa que le gustaría añadir acerca de la importancia de la narración?

Michael:  [Cuentacuentos] es vital. Para mí, como un maestro, es clave para que las ideas y comprensible por qué estoy compartiendo tiene valor.

Gracias a los permisos de Michael para hacer esta entrevista, así como el uso de su imagen.

 Apreciamos Michael compartiendo su experiencia y su influencia con la narración. Tienes esos momentos, también.

Aquí está por qué:

Michael tiene una historia. Usted tiene una historia. Todos tenemos historias.

Cap’s Off to You! Julie Jensen and Celebrating Story

Versión en Español se puede encontrar a continuación o haga clic aquí para ir allí. Haga clic en mí para saltar a la parte española. You can now donate as a one-time or as a recurring monthly with appreciation gifts by clicking here.  Give today!

Julie Jensen

Featuring:  Julie Jensen

Mom, Volunteer & Storyteller from UT

Julie Jensen brings her whole family to the art of storytelling.  Her children see how much she delights in crafting a tale, and this example lights the way for them.   Some of her youth have told stories before audiences or even to help train up-and-coming story coaches.  One time, she and her children told an impromptu story about aluminum cans and the great debate of stomping with feet or using the can crusher.  This normal chore became a laughing fest for those who listened that day.  I can imagine the fun stories shared around the Jensen kitchen table.

So enjoy the past, present, and future influences of storytelling in Julie’s life.

Rachel:  What drew you to storytelling/stories?

Julie:  After attending my first storytelling festival (Weber State University Storytelling Festival in February of 2012), I fell in love with storytelling. I have always enjoyed reading and getting drawn into a story. With storytelling, it is like that, but on a different level. You might be sitting in a large auditorium full of people, but somehow it feels personal and intimate. It is more than entertainment; it is sharing in a special way. I knew I wanted to be a part of that — to help people feel that, too.

Rachel:  What are some of your favorite stories? Why?

Julie:  Although I rarely tell them, I love personal tales the best. There’s so much to take from them. You can discover similarities as well as differences. You can view the world from a different perspective. You learn things about different times and places. It is a genre that I still want to discover how to tell for myself — and maybe that is why I appreciate someone else’s telling so very much more.

Rachel:  How have you seen the influence of stories and storytelling in what you do now (if at all)?

Julie:  Telling stories is such a powerful way of teaching. In my roles as a mother, Cub Scout leader, helper in classrooms, and others, there is always a call for teaching. I try to remember to use stories, often intermixed with song, as an element in teaching. I have also used it in my home as an activity to draw my children closer to me by sharing stories together.

Rachel:  What are your plans for storytelling/using stories in the future?   

Julie:  I’m always trying to add to the type and style of story I tell. Like I said before, I want to learn to tell good personal stories. Part of that is just practice and telling to audiences to see what works and what doesn’t. I’ve also been trying to “learn” to tell more impromptu stories. It is really stretching my brain to come up with things on the spot!

Rachel:  Anything you would like to add about the importance of storytelling?

Julie:  I don’t want to be redundant, but I just love the special, personal connections that are made through sharing stories. The part of me that enjoys learning about my family history loves learning the stories of my ancestors and feeling like they are really FAMILY. Laughing along with others at humorous tales, feeling the wonder of a fantastical story, being frightened at a scary story together, and sighing in relief at the end of an adventure: they are all connections. Family connections, community connections, human connections — they are important to strengthen and build. We learn more, experience more, love more. It is a beautiful thing.

Thank you to the permissions of Julie to do this interview as well as the use of her picture.

We appreciate Julie sharing her experience and influence with storytelling.  You have those moments, too.

Here is why:

Julie has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

Aquí lo tiene.
Julie Jensen

Con: Julie Jensen

Mamá, Voluntario y Narrador de UT

Julie Jensen aporta toda su familia con el arte de la narración.  Sus hijos ver cuánto ella se deleita en la elaboración de un cuento, y este ejemplo ilumina el camino para ellos.   Algunos de sus jóvenes tienen contaron historias ante audiencias o incluso para ayudar a capacitar a historia entrenadores.  Una vez, ella y sus hijos le dijo a una improvisada historia acerca de latas de aluminio y el gran debate de pisoteando con pies o utilizando el can crusher.  Este quehacer normal se convirtió en una risa fest para aquellos que escucharon ese día.  Me puedo imaginar la diversión compartida historias alrededor de la mesa de la cocina de Jensen.

Así que disfrute de los pasados, presentes y futuros de las influencias de la narración de cuentos en la vida de Julie.

Rachel:  Lo que le atrajo a la narración/historias?

Julie:  Después de asistir a mi primer storytelling Festival (Festival de Narración de Weber State University en Febrero de 2012), me enamoré de la narración. Siempre he disfrutado de la lectura y la obtención de dibujado en una historia. Con la narración de cuentos, es igual, pero en un nivel diferente. Usted podría estar sentado en un gran auditorio lleno de gente, pero de alguna manera se siente íntimo y personal. Es más que entretenimiento; es compartir de una manera especial. Yo sabía que quería ser parte de eso– para ayudar a la gente a sentir que, demasiado.

Rachel:  ¿Cuáles son algunas de tus historias favoritas? ¿Por qué?

Julie:  Aunque yo rara vez decirles, me encantan los relatos personales de los mejores. Hay mucho que sacar de ellas. Usted puede descubrir similitudes y diferencias. Usted puede ver el mundo desde una perspectiva diferente. Usted aprenderá cosas acerca de distintas épocas y lugares. Es un género que todavía quiero descubrir cómo saber para mí — y quizá por eso aprecio alguien dice mucho más.

Rachel: ¿Cómo han visto la influencia de historias y cuentos en lo que haces ahora (si en todos)?

Julie:  Contar historias es una forma poderosa de la enseñanza. En mis funciones como madre, Cub Scout Líder, ayudante en las aulas y otros, siempre hay una llamada para la enseñanza. Yo intente recordar utilizar historias, frecuentemente entremezcladas con la canción, como un elemento de enseñanza. También he usado en mi casa como una actividad para llamar a mis hijos cerca de mí por compartir historias juntos.

Rachel:  ¿Cuáles son tus planes para la narración/usar historias en el futuro?

Julie:  Siempre estoy tratando de agregar el tipo y el estilo de historia que contar. Como he dicho antes, quiero aprender a contar buenas historias personales. La parte de que se trata de practicar y diciéndole a las audiencias para ver qué funciona y qué no funciona. También he estado tratando de “aprender” para explicar más historias improvisadas. Es realmente estirar mi cerebro a venir para arriba con las cosas sobre el terreno!

Rachel:  Cualquier cosa que le gustaría añadir acerca de la importancia de la narración?

Julie:  Yo no quiero ser redundante, pero me encanta la especial, las conexiones personales que se realizan a través de compartir historias. La parte de mí que disfruta de aprender acerca de la historia de mi familia le encanta aprender las historias de mis antepasados y sentir que realmente son familia. Riendo, junto con otros, en el humor cuentos, sintiendo la maravilla de un cuento fantástico, asustarse en una historia de miedo juntos, y suspirando en relieve al final de una aventura: son todas las conexiones. Las conexiones familiares, relaciones comunitarias, conexiones humanas — son importantes para fortalecer y construir. Aprendemos más, experimentan más, amar más. Es una cosa hermosa.

Gracias a los permisos de Julie para hacer esta entrevista, así como el uso de su imagen.

Apreciamos Julie compartiendo su experiencia e influencia con la narración. Tienes esos momentos, también.

Aquí está por qué:

Julie tiene una historia. Usted tiene una historia. Todos tenemos historias.